Tuesday, July 30

Scrivener And Goodreader: How To Get Rid Of Paper Drafts

Scrivener And Goodreader: How To Get Rid Of Paper Drafts


I don't have a printer.

When I need something printed I go to the print shop across the street. It works fine, for the most part, but I don't like killing trees and it's inconvenient not to be able to print something the moment I need it.

The solution: Scrivener + Goodreader


I use Scrivener.

I used to use MS Word and I was (to put it mildly) reluctant to switch word processors. I'd used Word for a number of years, was very comfortable with it--my quibbles with The Ribbon notwithstanding.

But Scrivener has won me over. Having the ability to, at a glance, see a short one sentence description of not only each section but each scene, being able to set up my project targets (I enter the date I want the manuscript done by, the number of words I'd like it to contain and Scrivener will tell me how many words I have to write that day). I also can specify, for each scene, how many words I'd like it to contain and Scrivener will show me my progress graphically.

And the random name generator: heaven!

Anyway. Suffice it to say that I'm a Scrivener convert. You might be wondering what this has to do with a paperless office. I'm coming to that.

PDFs + Goodreader


Scrivener--like Word--gives you the option to output your work as a PDF.

Goodreader--the app--lets you use your finger, or a stylus, to markup PDF files.

This gives writers the ability to get rid of their printer. Here's how:
1. Output your work from your word processor as a PDF file.
2. Import it into Goodreader (many people use Dropbox or Google Drive for this),
3. Markup the PDF file with whatever changes you'd like to make,
4. Save the PDF file back to Dropbox, switch back to your word processor,
5. Open up the PDF doc in a separate window and make whatever changes you'd like to your original document.
That's it!

Perhaps laying it out like that, the five steps, makes it look like a lot of work, but it isn't. Or at least it's a lot less work than printing it out. And it allows one to get rid of paper!

I find this works the best for short stories and novellas, I still print out my novel length stories.

If you'd like to read more about this, here's a great article: The Virtual Red Pen.

More good news: Literature & Latte the creators of Scrivener, may have Scrivener on the iPad in time for NaNo this year!

Photo credit: "melancolia" by paul bica under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0.

6 comments:

  1. I went to try this out, but Goodreader is only available for Apple products. Hmm, I'll have to find something similar for Android. Thanks for the heads up on the paperless workflow.

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    1. Ack! I did not know that Goodreader was Apple only, thanks for the headsup, Andy.

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  2. I'm already a Scrivener convert. And I can't say enough about what an awesome writing tool it is. But I haven't tried Goodreader, so will check that out as well. Thanks!

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    1. Yes, do! I was surprised how easy it was to edit in Goodreader by writing with my finger. Actually, it's kinda fun. (grin)

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  3. I've been writing on Scrivener for a while now, and I have Goodreader on my ipad, but I've never tried to edit using Goodreader. It's a great suggestion. Thanks for the tip, Karen.

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    1. Glad the info was useful! I've been having fun using my finger as a virtual red pen, it makes me feel futuristic, like Captain Picard. (grin)

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